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Cyrus, Airport Kangaroo Released!


Cyrus Released 2 - MUST CREDIT www.wildlifevictoria.org.au

Wildlife Victoria volunteers were excited to see Cyrus, the kangaroo rescued from Melbourne Airport last month, released back to where he belongs.

 

Aptly named Cyrus, after a helpful Qantas staff member, the 3-4 year old eastern grey male kangaroo was reported to Wildlife Victoria’s emergency response service on the morning of 16th October after he made his way into the Qantas Terminal at Melbourne Airport. Bounding through the terminal, he found a quiet spot in the Chemist Shop which was cordoned off by staff. Wildlife Victoria quickly dispatched volunteer rescuers to the scene to rescue the frightened animal.

 

Cyrus spent just over 5 weeks recovering at a wildlife shelter north of Melbourne. Wildlife volunteers used caution with him and very little human contact as he was an extremely stressed out little kangaroo, which can sometimes lead to death in this delicate species of wildlife. On Friday 22nd November, Cyrus was release back into the wild, not far from where he was rescued.

 

Cyrus was one of 5,498 kangaroos reported to Wildlife Victoria in the last twelve months. As urban development encroaches further and further into kangaroo habitat, human vs animal conflict escalates and Wildlife Victoria is left to respond to this crisis.

 

 

16th October 2013

Just weeks after launching Wildlife Victoria’s new awareness campaign, Eyes Open for Wildlife, airport goers didn’t have to keep their eyes open too much to see an eastern grey kangaroo hopping through a Melbourne Airport terminal this morning and into a pharmacy.

 

 Melbourne Airport Roo

Federal Police were alerted to the emergency who promptly called Wildlife Victoria’s Emergency Response Service. Two trained rescue volunteers were immediately dispatched to the scene to offer assistance. Shortly after the kangaroo was tranquilised and captured safely.

 

Cyrus, as he has been aptly named after one of the helpers on the scene, will be assessed by a vet following his stressful ordeal.

 

 

Photo: Szumai Anderson